Ashes 2010: A Look at Two Batting Phenomenons

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above: Don Bradman (Left) and Walter Hammond (right) go for the toss

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The last batsman to score an Ashes double hundred was Paul Collingwood, but the Durham battler will have mixed emotions when he looks back on his 206 at Adelaide in 2006 given that England contrived to lose the match ignominiously on the final day.

The list below shows that there have been 34 double hundreds in Ashes contests with Len Hutton’s 364 at The Oval in 1938 sitting proudly at the top of the pile. With apologies to Bobby Simpson it is the other two batsmen to have scored more than one Ashes double hundred that dominate this list.

Scores of 200+ in The Ashes
Player Score Mins BF SR Ground Start Date
L Hutton (Eng) 364 797 847 42.97 The Oval 20-Aug-38
DG Bradman (Aus) 334 383 448 74.55 Leeds 11-Jul-30
RB Simpson (Aus) 311 762 740 42.02 Manchester 23-Jul-64
RM Cowper (Aus) 307 727 589 52.12 Melbourne 11-Feb-66
DG Bradman (Aus) 304 430 473 64.27 Leeds 20-Jul-34
RE Foster (Eng) 287 419 Sydney 11-Dec-03
DG Bradman (Aus) 270 458 375 72.00 Melbourne 01-Jan-37
WH Ponsford (Aus) 266 460 422 63.03 The Oval 18-Aug-34
KF Barrington (Eng) 256 683 Manchester 23-Jul-64
DG Bradman (Aus) 254 341 376 67.55 Lord’s 27-Jun-30
WR Hammond (Eng) 251 461 605 41.48 Sydney 14-Dec-28
JL Langer (Aus) 250 578 407 61.42 Melbourne 26-Dec-02
DG Bradman (Aus) 244 316 271 90.03 The Oval 18-Aug-34
WR Hammond (Eng) 240 367 394 60.91 Lord’s 24-Jun-38
SG Barnes (Aus) 234 649 667 35.08 Sydney 13-Dec-46
DG Bradman (Aus) 234 397 396 59.09 Sydney 13-Dec-46
DG Bradman (Aus) 232 438 417 55.63 The Oval 16-Aug-30
SJ McCabe (Aus) 232 235 277 83.75 Nottingham 10-Jun-38
WR Hammond (Eng) 231* 460 579 39.89 Sydney 18-Dec-36
RB Simpson (Aus) 225 545 427 52.69 Adelaide 28-Jan-66
MA Taylor (Aus) 219 554 461 47.50 Nottingham 10-Aug-89
E Paynter (Eng) 216* 319 333 64.86 Nottingham 10-Jun-38
DI Gower (Eng) 215 452 314 68.47 Birmingham 15-Aug-85
DG Bradman (Aus) 212 437 395 53.67 Adelaide 29-Jan-37
WL Murdoch (Aus) 211 490 525 40.19 The Oval 11 Aug 1884
KR Stackpole (Aus) 207 454 356 58.14 Brisbane 27-Nov-70
N Hussain (Eng) 207 437 337 61.42 Birmingham 05-Jun-97
WA Brown (Aus) 206* 369 370 55.67 Lord’s 24-Jun-38
AR Morris (Aus) 206 462 Adelaide 02-Feb-51
PD Collingwood (Eng) 206 515 392 52.55 Adelaide 01-Dec-06
J Ryder (Aus) 201* 385 461 43.60 Adelaide 16-Jan-25
SE Gregory (Aus) 201 243 Sydney 14 Dec 1894
AR Border (Aus) 200* 569 399 50.12 Leeds 22-Jul-93
WR Hammond (Eng) 200 398 472 42.37 Melbourne 29-Dec-28

Wally Hammond is arguably England’s greatest batsman ever and he certainly had a thirst for big scores. His peak came in the series of 1928-29 when at the age of 25 he scored a record 905 runs at 113.12 and became the first batsman to score two double hundreds in a series with 251 at Sydney and 200 at Melbourne. England won the series 4-1 and Hammond was acclaimed as the best batsman in the world.

Don Bradman made his debut in the same series and was no doubt in awe of Hammond’s achievements, but he was to surpass them only 18 months later. In the series of 1930 in England, Bradman did to England what Hammond had done to the Aussies by hitting 974 runs in the series at 139.14. The Don also took Hammond’s other record by hitting three double hundreds including 334 at Headingley – the then highest test score.

Hammond went on to hit two more double hundreds (Sydney 1936 and Lord’s 1938), but Bradman was to beat his counterpart here too by amassing eight Ashes double hundreds. Two more followed in the 1934 series in England as Australia took the Ashes back. Bradman hit another triple hundred (304) at Headingley and then hit a series clinching 244 at The Oval. He repeated the feat in the next series as Australia came back from 2-0 down to win 3-2 with Bradman hitting 270 at Melbourne and 212 at Adelaide.

Though Bradman’s achievements overshadowed those of Hammond, the fact that between them they scored 12 of the 34 scores of 200+ in Ashes history makes them collectively the two dominant batting phenomenons in the history of England-Australia encounters.


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